Hematologists


Overview

Hematologists

Introduction

Hematologists study and/or treat diseases of the blood and the blood-forming tissues. Some hematologists are physicians (doctors of medicine, or M.D.'s, or doctors of osteopathy, D.O.'s) who specialize in blood diseases; other hematologists are medical scientists (doctors of philosophy, or Ph.D.'s) who do research on blood diseases but do not treat patients. A few students who plan to focus on medical research choose to complete a joint M.D.-D.O./Ph.D. program.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$304,100

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Three to eight years in a residency program


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

After graduating from medical school, students spend at least two years in a hospital residency program. The average salary for medical residents was $61,200 in 2019, according to Medscape, a health care informatics firm. 

According to Salary.com, the median annual salary for hematologists-oncologists was $304,100 in February 2020, with salaries ran...

Work Environment

Hematologists often work in research laboratories as independent researchers and as part of a team. These laboratories can be part of a university, hospital, or government research facility. They may also be part of a teaching staff at a university or medical college. Hematologists who are physicians work in clinics, as part of a group practice, or as a member of a hospital or research team.

Outlook

The job outlook for hematologists is difficult to predict. There are many blood disease questions still to be solved, but the future of research depends on the availability of funding. Another factor that makes the future of this field unpredictable is the fact that other subspecialties are taking over some of the areas previously handled by hematologists. For instance, the relationship between...

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