Ophthalmologists


Overview

Introduction

Ophthalmologists are physicians who specialize in the care of eyes and in the prevention and treatment of eye disease and injury. They test patients' vision and prescribe glasses or contact lenses. Most ophthalmologists also perform eye surgery, treating problems such as cataracts (which cloud vision) and other visual impairments. Because problems with vision may signal larger health problems, ophthalmologists may work with other physicians to help patients deal with diseases such as diabetes or multiple sclerosis.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$295,431

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Employment Prospects

Excellent

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Residency


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Ophthalmologists' salaries vary by the size of the hospital or health care facility where they work and the city or town where they practice. Other factors affecting salary include the ophthalmologist's practice, hours worked per week, and professional reputation. Ophthalmologists earned median annual salaries of $295,431 in May 2020, according to Salary.com. Salaries ranged from less than $248...

Work Environment

The offices and examining rooms of most ophthalmologists are well equipped, attractive, well lighted, and well ventilated. There is usually at least one nurse-receptionist on the ophthalmologists' staff, and there may be several nurses, a laboratory technician, one or more secretaries, a bookkeeper, or receptionist.

Ophthalmologists usually see patients by appointments that are scheduled...

Outlook

Employment for physicians is projected to grow by 7 percent, faster than the average for all careers, through 2028, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook. However, the demand for specialty care may provide more job opportunities for ophthalmologists and other specialists. The increasing number of elderly people will drive demand for vision care. Also, new technology (such as a...

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