Radiologists


Overview

Radiologists

Introduction

Radiologists use images from X-rays and radioactive materials to examine and diagnose patients' diseases, injuries, and disorders. The images may be of a patient's body tissues, organs, or bones, and they allow attending physicians to know the exact nature of a patient's injury or disease, such as the location of a broken bone or the confirmation of an ulcer. They prepare reports of their findings and share the diagnostic information or results with physicians, patients, or families.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$283,907

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Four-year residency


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Curious

Earnings

Entry-level radiologists earned a median salary of $283,907 in 2020, according to PayScale.com. Salaries ranged from about $95,000 to $355,000. Experienced radiologists earned a median salary of $416,283, as reported by Salary.com. The lowest 10 percent earned $312,434 or less and the top 10 percent earned $541,042 or more per year.

Radiologists usually have benefits such as paid vacatio...

Work Environment

Radiologists generally work during business hours, usually 40 hours per week. Those that work for hospitals and clinics that are open around the clock may work additional hours and be on call for emergency situations. They work in clean, well lit, organized environments, spending much of the workday on computers, examining images, conducting research, and reading and writing reports. They wear ...

Outlook

Employment for physicians and surgeons overall is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2028, according to the Department of Labor. Radiologists will continue to have good job prospects in the coming years. Several factors are contributing to this growth: the aging population, new technologies, and more access to health insurance. Medical advances and new technolo...

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