Podiatrists


Overview

Podiatrists

Introduction

Podiatrists, or doctors of podiatric medicine, are specialists in diagnosing and treating disorders and diseases of the foot, ankle, and lower leg. They treat bunions, calluses, corns, warts, ingrown toenails, heel spurs, arch problems, and ankle and foot injuries. Podiatrists also treat deformities and infections. A podiatrist may prescribe treatment by medical, surgical, and mechanical or physical means.

The human foot is a complex structure, containing 26 bones plus muscles, nerves, ligaments, and blood vessels. The 52 tot...

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$126,240

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Residency


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Skills

Business Management


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Podiatrists had median annual earnings of $126,240 in May 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The lowest 10 percent earned $54,150, and the top 25 percent earned $208,000 or more annually. Podiatrists who worked in outpatient care centers had the highest annual mean salaries of $173,630. 

Podiatrists who work for hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and other employers re...

Work Environment

Most podiatrists work independently in their own offices or in a group practice. The workweek is generally 40 to 60 hours per week. Podiatrists usually can set their own hours to coordinate office hours with hospital staff time or teaching schedules.

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts average employment growth for podiatrists through 2028. Demand for podiatrists' skills is rapidly increasing as the profession gains recognition as a health care specialty and as foot disorders become more widespread. More people are involved in sports and fitness programs, which can cause foot problems or make existing foot problems more apparent or unbear...

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