Hospitalists


Overview

Hospitalists

Introduction

Hospitalists are physicians who care for patients when they are hospitalized. They admit patients, perform medical procedures, design treatment plans, and communicate and coordinate care with patients and other hospital staff. They ensure that patients receive the care needed and coordinate resources for patients when they are discharged. Hospitalists hold either a doctor of medicine (M.D.) or osteopathic medicine (D.O.) degree. The Society of Hospital Medicine estimates that there are at least 44,000 hospit...

Quick Facts


More

Median Salary

$242,000

More

Employment Prospects

Good

More

Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


More

Experience

Three to eight years residency


More

Skills

Interpersonal


More

Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) reports that wages for physicians and surgeons are among the highest of all occupations. While the DOL does not specifically report earnings for hospitalists, it does report salary information for family and general practitioners and general internists. It reports that general internists had a median annual salary of $194,500, while family and general practiti...

Work Environment

Hospitalists work in hospitals and other health care facilities. Depending on the size of the facility, there may be three to four hospitalists working the day shift and one or two working the night shift. Busy large hospitals may have even more.

Hours are long and can be erratic. Schedules may be challenging. Hospitalists may, for example, work 12-hour shifts (...

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor does not provide an employment outlook for hospitalists. It does report that job opportunities for physicians and surgeons who work in hospitals will increase by 4 percent (about as fast as the average for all occupations) from 2018 through 2028. Employment prospects will be especially good for those who are willing to practice in rural and low-income a...

Related Professions