Geriatric Nurses


Overview

Geriatric Nurses

Introduction

Geriatric nurses provide direct patient care to elderly people in their homes, or in hospitals, nursing homes, and clinics. The term geriatrics refers to the clinical aspects of aging and the overall health care of the aging population. Since older people tend to have different reactions to illness and disease than younger people, treating them has become a specialty, and because the population is aging, the geriatric nurse is a promising nursing specialty.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$70,171

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Employment Prospects

Excellent

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Minimum Education Level

Associate's Degree


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Experience

One to three years' experience as a staff nurse


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Registered nurses had median annual earnings of $71,730 in May 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Salaries ranged from less than $50,800 to more than $101,630. Those working in home health care services earned $71,850, and RNs who worked at nursing care facilities earned $67,370.  

Registered nurses who worked in geriatric care earned a median salary of $70,171...

Work Environment

Geriatric nurses can expect to work in a variety of settings depending on their nursing responsibilities. Many geriatric nurses work in nursing homes, hospitals, retirement communities, or in clinics. They may also work with hospice and community nursing programs, or as office nurses for geriatricians.

Although most health care environments are clean and well lighted, there may be some n...

Outlook

Employment for registered nurses who work in services for the elderly and persons with disabilities is expected to grow by 35.3 percent through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, as a result of a rapidly increasing elderly population. The U.S. Census Bureau predicts that the population age 65 and over will more than double by 2030 (increasing from approximately 35 million in...

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