Neurologists


Overview

Neurologists

Introduction

Neurologists are physician specialists who diagnose and treat patients with diseases and disorders affecting such areas as the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, muscles, and autonomic nervous system. In 2019, there were 390,680 physicians, all other (including neurologists), employed in the United States, according to the Department of Labor.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$255,900

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Employment Prospects

Excellent

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Residency


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Individual salaries for neurologists vary depending on such factors as type and size of practice, geographic area, and professional reputation. According to information from Salary.com Inc., in 2020 neurologists earned an average of $255,900 annually. Those on the lowest end of the salary scale earned $194,384, while the highest salaries were approximately $341,106 or more. The Department of La...

Work Environment

Neurologists, like many physicians, must divide their time between patient consultations, study and publishing, and office or departmental administration. Most neurologists work far more than 40 hours a week. A neurologist may see anywhere between 10 and 30 patients each day. They perform medical histories, diagnose problems, and explain treatment and rehabilitation options.

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor projects occupations in the health care field to grow by 14 percent, much faster than the average, through 2028. The DOL reports that patient demand should create a substantial number of jobs for specialists. The future for neurologists, therefore, should be bright as the need for their expertise increases. One reason for this increased need is the country's growing...

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