Dermatologists


Overview

Introduction

Dermatologists study, diagnose, and treat diseases and ailments of the skin, hair, mucous membranes, nails, and related tissues or structures. They may also perform cosmetic services, such as scar removal or hair transplants. There are approximately 756,800 physicians and surgeons of all types working in the United States. According to the American Medical Association, approximately 1.5 percent specialize in dermatology.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$419,000

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Minimum 12 years, including post-graduate education, internship,


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Skills

Business Management


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Earnings for dermatologists are affected by number of years in practice, geographic region, hours worked, and the skill, personality, and professional standing of the doctor. According to the Medscape Dermatologist Compensation Report 2019, the mean annual salary of dermatologists was $419,000. The lowest-paid 10 percent of all physicians earned less than $60,280 in May 2018, according...

Work Environment

Dermatologists are often solo practitioners. They work in well-lighted, air-conditioned offices, and they are usually assisted by clerical and nursing staff. A certain number of hours are spent each week visiting patients at the hospital. Most dermatologists also spend some time in laboratory settings, either on their own or in a hospital. Most specialists, including dermatologists, work in lar...

Outlook

The health care industry is thriving, and the U.S. Department of Labor predicts that employment for physicians will grow faster than the average for all careers from 2018 to 2028. The field of dermatology is expected to expand for a number of reasons. New technologies, medicines, and treatments continue to be developed at a rapid pace. Another factor in the growth of this industry is that the a...

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