Perfusionists


Overview

Perfusionists

Introduction

Perfusionists, formerly known as cardiovascular perfusionists or clinical perfusionists, play a crucial role in the field of cardiovascular surgery. They operate what is known as the "heart-lung machine," among other duties. The perfusionist is responsible for all aspects of the heart-lung machine whenever it becomes necessary to interrupt or replace the functioning of the heart by circulating blood outside of a patient's body. There are approximately 4,400 perfusionists employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$135,012

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Clinical training


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Skills

Computer


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Salaries for perfusionists compare favorably with those of other allied health professionals and are generally higher than most cardiovascular technologists. According to a survey by PayScale.com, the average annual salary for perfusionists nationwide was $119,628 in 2020. Salary.com found a higher median salary of $135,012 for perfusionists with the top 10 percent earning $158,698 and the lowe...

Work Environment

Perfusionists typically work in operating rooms of hospitals. They work alongside the operating table as part of the surgical team; it is the responsibility of the perfusionist to see that the equipment is properly assembled and maintained at all times.

Perfusionists frequently must spend long hours in operating rooms, often under stressful conditions. Although most perfusionists average...

Outlook

Employment for cardiovascular technologists and technicians (which are related careers) is expected to grow faster than the average through 2028 due to general rising demand for cardiovascular procedures, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The number of Americans age 65 and over continues to rise. This demographic group is at a higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease, which re...

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