Clinical Nurse Specialists


Overview

Introduction

Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs), a classification of advanced practice nurses (APNs), are registered nurses who have completed advanced clinical nurses' educational practice requirements. Qualified to handle a wide variety of physical and mental health problems, CNSs are primarily involved in providing primary health care and psychotherapy. Approximately 3.1 million registered nurses, which includes clinical nurse specialists, are employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


More

Median Salary

$105,258

More

Employment Prospects

Good

More

Minimum Education Level

Master's Degree


More

Experience

Internships and clinical rotations


More

Skills

Leadership


More

Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Earnings for CNSs vary according to such factors as person's education and level of experience, type of employer, and geographic location. The median salary for clinical nurse specialists in 2019 was $105,258, according to Salary.com. Salaries ranged from less than $95,170 to $115,294 per year or more. Benefits for full-time workers include paid vacation, health, disability, life insurance, and...

Work Environment

Clinical nurse specialists work primarily in hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes but may work out of their own homes and other community-based settings, including industry, home health care, and health maintenance organizations.

The work environment for CNSs varies by their employment setting. For example, clinical nurse specialists who work directly with patients may occasionally encou...

Outlook

Employment of registered nurses is expected to grow 12 percent (or much faster than the average for all careers) from 2018 to 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Growth will occur because of an increase in the demand for health care services. Several factors—including health care legislation and the resulting newly insured, an increased emphasis on preventative care, and the large,...

Related Professions