Allergists/Immunologists


Overview

Allergists/Immunologists

Introduction

Allergists/immunologists are physicians that specialize in the treatment of allergic, asthmatic, and immunologic diseases. They treat patients with asthma, hay fever, food allergies, AIDS, allergic diseases of the eye and skin, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. There are approximately 5,440 board-certified allergists/immunologists employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$247,644

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Doctorate


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Experience

Medical residency and fellowship


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Physicians are rewarded well for their years of intensive study, for their long hours, and for their level of responsibility. Physicians who were still in their residencies earned an average of between $56,126 and $74,024 in the 2018–2019 academic year, according to a survey by the Association of American Medical Colleges. The average annual salary for physicians and surgeons was $250,000 in 20...

Work Environment

Allergists/immunologists often work in offices, hospitals, or other health care facilities, where they work with nurses and other doctors. Most physicians' offices are well maintained, as a clean environment is essential to good practice. Allergists/immunologists who work in hospitals may have an office there. In general, like all doctors, allergists/immunologists must work well with administra...

Outlook

Employment of physicians will grow faster than the average through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Health care-related services will continue to expand rapidly as a result of the growing U.S. population and the increasing number of older individuals. More than 50 million Americans suffer from some kind of allergy, fueling the demand for allergists/immunologists. Though some doc...

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