Dietetic Technicians


Overview

Dietetic Technicians

Introduction

Dietetic technicians work in hospitals, nursing homes, public health nutritional programs, food companies, and other institutional settings that require food-service management and nutritional-care services. They usually work under the direction of a dietitian or nutritionist as members of a team. The two basic types of work for technicians are food-service administration and clinical nutrition. There are approximately 34,800 dietetic technicians employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$27,140

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

High School Diploma


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Experience

Practicum


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Skills

Business Management


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Personality Traits

Conventional

Earnings

Earnings vary widely depending on the employer, the education, the experience of the dietetic technician, and the nature of his or her responsibilities. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, dietetic technicians had median annual earnings of $27,140 in May 2018, and the lowest 10 percent earned $19,410, and the top ten percent earned $46,100.

Salaries vary by employer. For example, ...

Work Environment

Dietary departments in health care facilities are generally well lighted, clean, well ventilated, and near the kitchen areas. Kitchens and serving areas, however, may be intensely active at peak hours and are often very hot, steamy, and noisy. Most dietetic technicians in food-service administration jobs work 40-hour weeks, and may be required to work some nights, weekends, or on an irregular s...

Outlook

Employment for dietetic technicians is expected to grow 6 percent from 2018 to 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, or about as fast as the average for all careers. It is expected that as the need for dietitians grows, so will the need for technicians assisting them.

This growth is due in part to the strong emphasis placed on nutrition and health in this country and the fact ...

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