Neonatal Nurses


Overview

Introduction

Neonatal nurses provide direct patient care to newborns in hospitals for the first month after birth. The babies they care for may be normal, they may be born prematurely, or they may be suffering from an illness or birth defect. Some of the babies require highly technical care, such as surgery or the use of ventilators, incubators, or intravenous feedings.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$73,300

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Employment Prospects

Excellent

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Prior experience as a registered nurse


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Salary is determined by many factors, including nursing specialty, education, place of employment, shift worked, geographic location, and work experience. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, registered nurses working at hospitals had a median annual income of $73,300 in 2019. The lowest paid 10 percent of all registered nurses earned less than $52,080 per year. The highest paid 10 percen...

Work Environment

Neonatal nurses can expect to work in a hospital environment that is clean and well lighted. Inner-city hospitals may be in a less-than-desirable location, and safety may be an issue. Generally, neonatal nurses who wish to advance in their careers will find themselves working in larger hospitals in major cities.

Nurses usually spend much of the day on their feet, either walking or standi...

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that employment for all registered nurses will grow much faster than the average through 2028. In addition, nursing specialties should be in great demand in the future. The outlook for neonatal nurses is very good, especially for those with master's degrees or higher. According to the National Association of Neonatal Nurses, positions should be available du...

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