Ergonomists


Overview

Ergonomists

Introduction

Ergonomists help increase human productivity, comfort, safety, and health, and to decrease injury and illness by designing human-centered equipment, furniture, work methods, and techniques. They combine knowledge from various sciences and apply it to jobs, systems, products, and environments. Ergonomists are also known as human factors engineers and human factors specialists.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$74,267

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Master's Degree


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Experience

Internship or assistantship


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Skills

Drawing/Design


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Personality Traits

Creative

Earnings

Median annual earnings of ergonomists were $74,267 in November 2019, according to Salary.com. Salaries ranged from $64,244 to $87,220 or more. Individuals with certification, advanced education, and work experience can expect to have the highest earnings.

Private consultants, including self-employed ergonomists, charge a wide range of hourly fees, from $100 to more than $200, depending o...

Work Environment

Ergonomists encounter various working conditions, depending on specific duties and responsibilities. An ergonomist may work in a typical office environment, with computer and data processing equipment close at hand. The ergonomist may also work in a factory, investigating production problems. Usually, ergonomists do both: They work in an office setting and make frequent visits to a factory or o...

Outlook

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employment of occupational health and safety specialists, including ergonomists, is projected to grow 6 percent through 2028, about as fast as the average for all careers. Employment will be good for ergonomists who have advanced degrees and certification.

As the public has gained an increased understanding of and appreciation for ergonomy and a...

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