Endodontists


Overview

Endodontists

Introduction

Endodontists are dental specialists who diagnose and treat diseases of the dental pulp and root. They perform root canal treatment, often handling cases that are too complicated for a general dentist. Endodontists also treat oral trauma, managing teeth that have been cracked or broken, knocked out, twisted in the socket, or pushed further into the tooth socket. The American Association of Endodontists has more than 8,000 members.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$200,583

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Internship/practicum


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

Endodontists earned a median annual salary of $200,583 in 2019, according to PayScale.com. Salaries ranged from $91,000 to $340,000. According to the American Dental Association, the average net income for independent specialists in private practice was $330,180 in 2018.

Salaries vary by geographic region and are influenced by the number of other endodontists practicing ...

Work Environment

Most endodontists work in private dental practices. The hours they work vary. Endodontists treat many toothaches on an emergency basis, so they may be on call during the night.

While many dentists wear comfortable business attire underneath a laboratory coat, some opt to wear surgical scrubs when treating patients.

Endodontists may travel from time to time to attend continuing edu...

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor projects that employment for specialty dentists (except oral and maxillofacial surgeons, orthodontists, and prosthodontists) is expected to increase about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2028. As long as people place a priority on retaining their teeth, endodontists' services will continue to be in demand. The longer life spans of the U.S. populat...

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