Urologists


Overview

Urologists

Introduction

Urologists are physicians and surgeons who specialize in the treatment of medical and surgical disorders of the adrenal gland and of the genitourinary system. They deal with the diseases of both the male and female urinary tract and of the male reproductive organs. According to the Department of Labor, there were approximately 49,500 internists, including urologists, employed in the United States in May 2019.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$201,590

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Medical Degree


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Experience

Residency


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Helpful

Earnings

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the mean annual salary for physicians who specialized in internal medicine was $201,590 in May 2019. Some internists earn less than $60,970. Very experienced urologists can earn more than $325,000 annually.

Urologists who work for hospitals and other employers usually receive benefits such as vacation days, sick leave, health and life insurance,...

Work Environment

Like other physicians and surgeons, urologists typically work in small private offices or clinics with a staff of nurses and administrative support employees. When performing surgery, urologists work in well-lighted, sterile environments. Most work long, irregular hours. Those who work in a group setting, such as in a health care organization or group practice, may have less work stress than in...

Outlook

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, employment for all physicians and surgeons is expected to grow by 4 percent, about as fast as the average for all occupations, through 2029. Employment prospects for urologists are good. The demographics of American society illustrate that the growth in the aging population will increase demand for services that cater, in large part, to t...

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