Instrumentation Technicians


Overview

Instrumentation Technicians

Introduction

Instrumentation technicians are skilled craftsworkers who do precision work and are involved in the field of measurement and control. Technicians inspect, test, repair, and adjust instruments that detect, measure, and record changes in industrial environments. They work with theoretical or analytical problems, helping engineers improve instrument and system performance.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$55,000

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Employment Prospects

Fair

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Minimum Education Level

Associate's Degree


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Experience

Internship or part-time job


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Earnings for instrumentation technicians vary by industry, geographic region, educational background, experience, and level of responsibility.

Electrical and electronic engineering technicians had median annual earnings of $65,260 in May 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Earnings ranged from less than $39,190 to $96,690 or more. Mechanical engineering technicians earned me...

Work Environment

Working conditions vary widely for instrumentation technicians. An oil refinery plant job is as different from space mission instrumentation work as a nuclear reactor instrumentation job is different from work in the operating room of a hospital. All these jobs use similar principles, however, and instrumentation technicians can master new areas by applying what they have learned previously. Fo...

Outlook

The employment outlook for instrumentation technicians varies by specialty. For example, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) predicts that employment for mechanical engineering technicians will grow by 3 percent (more slowly than the average for all careers) through 2028. Little or no change in employment for electromechanical technicians and  industrial engineering technicians is expected throu...

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