Millwrights


Overview

Millwrights

Introduction

Millwrights install, assemble, and maintain heavy industrial machinery and other equipment. If necessary, they construct foundations for certain large assemblies. They may also dismantle, operate, or repair these machines. Approximately 44,300 millwrights are employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


More

Median Salary

$55,060

More

Employment Prospects

Good

More

Minimum Education Level

Apprenticeship


More

Experience

A solid background in mathematics and science will be helpful


More

Skills

Building/Trades


More

Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Salary rates can vary depending on experience, geographic location, industry, and union membership. Millwrights are typically paid by the hour. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, median hourly earnings for millwrights were $26.47 (or $55,0600 annually) in May 2018. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $16.39 an hour (or $34,090 annually) and the highest 10 percent earned more than $38...

Work Environment

A significant number of millwrights work more than 40 hours a week. They often work overtime and in varying shifts to accommodate production schedules. Millwrights may be called to work at unusual times or for longer hours during emergencies. An equipment breakdown can affect an entire plant's operation and be very costly, so machines need to be immediately tended to when problems arise. Rearra...

Outlook

Employment for millwrights is expected to grow by 9 percent, faster than the average for all careers, through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Millwrights will be needed to keep existing machinery in working order, dismantle outdated machinery, and install new equipment. The growth of the power industry is also expected to add some employment opportunities for millwrights, who w...

Related Professions