Industrial Radiographers


Overview

Industrial Radiographers

Introduction

Industrial radiographers, using radiography, are employed in industrial settings as part of the larger field of nondestructive testing (NDT). The three most common types of careers are radiographers, or X-ray technicians; isotope production technicians; and hot cell technicians. These three fields are all concerned with the practical applications of radiation in its various forms.

Radiographers conduct X-ray examinations of materials, such as metals, plastics, and concrete, and of specific products, such as metal cas...

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$69,601

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Associate's Degree


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Experience

On-the-job training


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Wages for industrial radiographers depend on the employer as well as the academic background and related work experience of the employee. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, radiologic technicians, which includes medical radiographers, earned a median salary of $59,520 in May 2018, with the lowest 10 percent earning $40,630 or less and the highest 10 percent earning $8...

Work Environment

Because of the strict regulations when working with radioisotopes and the cost involved in equipping a radiation laboratory, excellent working conditions are usually ensured for industrial radiographers. As the job descriptions imply, some responsibilities involve working in welding shops, shipyards, and construction sites where conditions are extremely variable.

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor does not currently forecast employment prospects for industrial radiographers. By some estimates, employment in this field will grow faster than the average for all industries over the next decade. Other estimates foresee more moderate growth, and some foresee actual declines. Many of the larger employers, such as nuclear research facilities, are dependent on govern...

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