Numerical Control Tool Programmers


Overview

Numerical Control Tool Programmers

Introduction

Numerical control tool programmers, also called computer numerical control tool programmers, develop programs that enable machine tools to produce parts automatically. These precisely made parts are used in automobiles, airplanes, industrial machinery, and other durable goods. There are approximately 24,300 numerical control programmers and operators in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$56,450

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Employment Prospects

Poor

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Minimum Education Level

High School Diploma


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Experience

Experience as a machinist


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

The median hourly salary for computer numerically controlled tool programmers was $27.14 (or $56,450 annually) in 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $17.44 (or $36,280 annually), and the highest 10 percent earned more than $42.87 (or $89,170 annually).

Benefits vary but may include paid vacations and holidays, personal leaves, medical,...

Work Environment

Numerical control tool programmers generally work a 40-hour week, although overtime is common during peak periods. To justify the costly investments in machinery, some employers extend hours of operation, requiring CNC programmers to work evening and weekend shifts.

Programmers work in comfortable office surroundings, set apart from the noisier, more hazardous shop floor. Their work is m...

Outlook

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the employment of metal and plastic machine workers, which includes numerical control tool programmers, is expected to decline by 8 percent through 2028. Initially, employment of CNC programmers was made possible by the introduction of new automation, but recent technological advancements, such as computer-aided design software, are reduc...

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