Diesel Mechanics


Overview

Diesel Mechanics

Introduction

Diesel mechanics repair and maintain diesel engines that power trucks, buses, ships, construction and roadbuilding equipment, farm equipment, and some automobiles. They may also maintain and repair nonengine components, such as brakes, electrical systems, and heating and air conditioning. Approximately 285,300 diesel mechanics work in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$47,350

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

High School Diploma


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Experience

Minimum two years with long-term on-the-job training


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Conventional

Earnings

Diesel mechanics' earnings vary depending upon their region, industry (trucking, construction, railroad), and other factors. Technicians in the West and Northeast tend to earn more than those in other regions, although these distinctions are gradually disappearing.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), the median hourly pay for all diesel mechanics in May 2018 was $22.76, or a...

Work Environment

Depending on the size of the shop and whether it is a trucking or construction company, government, or private business, diesel mechanics work with anywhere from two to 20 other mechanics. Most shops are well lighted and well ventilated. They can be frequently noisy due to running trucks and equipment. Hoses are attached to exhaust pipes and led outside to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.

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Outlook

With diesel technology getting better (smaller, smarter, and less noisy), more light trucks and other vehicles and equipment are switching to diesel engines. Diesel engines are already more fuel-efficient than gasoline engines. Also, the increased reliance by businesses on quick deliveries has increased the demand on trucking companies. Many businesses maintain lower inventories of materials, i...

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