Industrial Machinery Mechanics


Overview

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

Introduction

Industrial machinery mechanics—often called machinery maintenance mechanics, maintenance machinists, or industrial machinery repairers—inspect, maintain, repair, and adjust industrial production and processing machinery and equipment to ensure its proper operation in various industries. There are approximately 381,500 industrial machinery mechanics employed in the United States. 

Quick Facts


More

Median Salary

$52,340

More

Employment Prospects

Excellent

More

Minimum Education Level

Some Postsecondary Training


More

Experience

Apprenticeship or on-the-job training


More

Skills

Building/Trades


More

Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

In May 2018, median hourly earnings for industrial machinery mechanics were $25.16 (or $52,340 annually), according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The lowest paid 10 percent earned less than $16.19 an hour (or $33,670 annually). The highest 10 percent earned $37.59 or more per hour (or $78,190 annually). Apprentices generally earn lower wages and earn incremental raises as they advance in the...

Work Environment

Industrial machinery mechanics work in all types of manufacturing plants, which may be hot, noisy, and dirty or relatively quiet and clean. Mechanics frequently work with greasy, dirty equipment and need to be able to adapt to a variety of physical conditions. Because machinery is not always accessible, mechanics may have to work in stooped or cramped positions or on high ladders.

Althou...

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that employment for industrial machinery mechanics will grow about as fast as the average for all careers through 2028 because "increased automation, including the use of many computer-controlled machines in factories and manufacturing plants, should raise the demand for machinery maintenance workers in order to keep the machines functioning properly." Some...

Related Professions