Electrical Engineers


Overview

Introduction

Electrical engineers apply their knowledge of the sciences to working with equipment that produces and distributes electricity, such as generators, transmission lines, and transformers. They also design, develop, and manufacture electric motors, electrical machinery, and ignition systems for automobiles, aircraft, and other engines. There are approximately 193,100 electrical engineers employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$98,530

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Internship


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Starting salaries for all engineers are generally much higher than for workers in any other field. Entry-level electrical engineers with a bachelor's degree in engineering earn a median salary of $69,000, according to a winter 2019 salary survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. The U.S. Department of Labor reports that the median annual salary for electrical engineers was ...

Work Environment

At some companies, a five-day, 40-hour workweek is still the norm, but it is becoming much less common. Many electrical engineers regularly work 10 or 20 hours of overtime a week. Electrical engineers in research and development, or those conducting experiments, often need to work at night or on weekends. Workers who supervise production activities may need to come in during the evenings or on ...

Outlook

Average employment growth, about 3 percent is expected for electrical engineers through 2029, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook. In 2020, the coronavirus pandemic "mildly affected" the utilities industry, according to an IBISWorld report. A slight decline in revenue in the electric power industry was expected for 2020, and because many offices and facilities have temporari...

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