Arborists


Overview

Arborists

Introduction

Arborists are professionals who practice arboriculture, which is the care of trees and shrubs, especially those found in urban areas. Arborists prune and fertilize trees and other woody plants as well as monitor them for insects and diseases. Arborists, who are also known as tree trimmers and pruners, are often consulted for various tree-related issues. Approximately 42,440 tree trimmers and pruners are employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$38,190

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Associate's Degree


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Experience

On-the-job training


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Skills

Business Management


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Personality Traits

Conventional

Earnings

Tree trimmers and pruners earned median annual salaries of $38,190 in May 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The bottom 10 percent earned $24,330 a year or less, and the top 10 percent earned $61,310 a year or more. In July 2019, SimplyHired.com reported the average salary for arborists was $36,491.

Entry-level positions, such as grounds workers or trainees, pay about $10 a...

Work Environment

Much of an arborist's work is physically demanding, and most of it is done outdoors. Arborists work throughout the year, though their busiest time is in the spring and summer. Tasks done at this time include fertilizing, pruning, and prevention spraying. During the winter months, arborists can expect to care for trees injured or damaged by excess snow, ice storms, or floods.

Equipment su...

Outlook

Employment of tree trimmers and pruners is expected to grow by 10 percent, which is faster than the average for all careers, through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The public's increasing interest in the planning and the preservation of the environment has maintained demand for qualified arborists. Towns across the country are planting large numbers of trees to improve the env...

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