Geophysicists


Overview

Geophysicists

Introduction

Geophysicists are geoscientists who are concerned with matter and energy and how they interact. They study the physical properties and structure of the earth, from its interior to its upper atmosphere, including land surfaces, subsurfaces, and bodies of water. There are approximately 31,000 geoscientists and 6,700 hydrologists employed in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$91,130

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Internship or co-op experience helpful


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Problem-Solving

Earnings

According to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), geoscientists (which includes geophysicists) earned an average annual salary of $91,130 in May 2018. The lowest paid 10 percent earned less than $49,430 per year, while the highest paid 10 percent earned more than $187,990 annually. The average salary for a geophysicist working for state government agencies was $76,670. Hydrologists earned salari...

Work Environment

Geophysicists employed in laboratories or offices generally work a regular 40-hour week under typical office conditions. Field geophysicists work under a variety of conditions and often the hours are irregular. They are outdoors much of the time in all kinds of weather. The work requires carrying small tools and equipment and occasionally some heavy lifting. Field geophysicists often travel to ...

Outlook

Employment of all geoscientists is expected to grow as fast as the average for all occupations through 2028, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook. The total number of graduates with degrees in the geophysical sciences is expected to remain small and insufficient to meet the increase in industry job openings.

In recent years, the petroleum industry, the largest employer...

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