Zoologists


Overview

Zoologists

Introduction

Zoologists are biologists who study animals. They often select a particular type of animal to study, and they may study an entire animal, one part or aspect of an animal, or a whole animal society or ecosystem. There are many areas of specialization from which a zoologist can choose, such as origins, genetics, characteristics, classifications, behaviors, life processes, and distribution of animals. There are approximately 21,000 zoologists and wildlife biologists employed in the United States. 

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$63,270

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Internship


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Skills

Research


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Personality Traits

Curious

Earnings

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the median annual wage for zoologists and wildlife biologists was $63,270 in May 2019. Salaries ranged from less than $38,880 a year to more than $101,780 a year, depending on the zoologist's education and experience.

The benefits that zoologists receive as part of their employment vary widely. Employees of the federal government or top universi...

Work Environment

There is much variation in the conditions under which zoologists work. Professors of zoology may teach exclusively during the school year or may both teach and conduct research. Many professors whose school year consists of teaching spend their summers doing research. Research scientists spend some time in the field, but most of their work is done in the laboratory. There are zoologists who spe...

Outlook

Employment for zoologists and wildlife biologists will grow about as fast as the average for all careers through 2029, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH). "Zoologists and wildlife biologists will be needed to study human and wildlife interactions as the human population grows and development impacts wildlife and their natural habitats," the OOH explains. "However, bec...

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