Foresters


Overview

Foresters

Introduction

Foresters protect and manage forest resources, one of our greatest natural assets, through various biological techniques. Using their specialized knowledge of tree biology and ecology, wood science, and manufacturing processes, they manage forests for timber production, protect them from fire and pest damage, harvest mature forests, and re-establish new forests after harvesting. Foresters hold about 9,000 jobs in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$61,410

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Employment Prospects

Fair

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Experience as a forestry intern or forestry technician


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Skills

Math


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Personality Traits

Enterprising

Earnings

Median annual earnings of foresters were 61,410 in May 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Salaries ranged from less than $41,350 for the lowest paid 10 percent to more than $86,870 for the highest paid 10 percent. Foresters working for the federal government earned an average salary of $66,040. Mean annual salaries in state and local governments were generally somewhat lower,

Work Environment

Foresters generally work a 40-hour week, although they must be prepared for overtime duty, particularly when emergency conditions arise. In the field, foresters encounter many different conditions, such as snow, rain, freezing cold, or extreme heat. They may sometimes be faced with hazardous conditions, such as forest fires.

Work as a forester is often strenuous. There is a lot of walkin...

Outlook

Little or no change in employment is expected for foresters through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). Most employment growth for foresters will occur for those who work in state- and local-owned forests, particularly in the western United States. The DOL reports that the "prevention and suppression of wildfires has become the primary concern for government agencies managing...

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