Aquarists


Overview

Aquarists

Introduction

Aquarists work for aquariums, oceanariums, and marine research institutes. They maintain aquatic exhibits. Among other duties, they feed the fish, check water quality, clean the tanks, and collect and transport new specimens.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$29,290

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Employment Prospects

Fair

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Internships


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Skills

Mechanical/Manual Dexterity


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Aquariums often are nonprofit institutions, limiting the earnings ability in this job somewhat. In general, aquarists make between $24,960 and $45,760 a year, according to a May 2017 Glassdoor estimate, which indicated that salaries averaged $29,120. Senior aquarists can make $55,000 or more per year, and aquarist supervisors or managers may command higher earnings. The closest job to aquarist ...

Work Environment

Aquarists may work indoors or outdoors, depending on the facility for which they work and the exhibit to which they're assigned. Aquarists spend a lot of time in the water. Their day will be filled with a variety of tasks, some repetitive, like feeding, others unusual, such as working with rescued marine mammals, perhaps. In the beginning, aquarists work under the supervision of a senior aquari...

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that employment opportunities for nonfarm animal caretakers will increase at a rate that is much faster than the average for all occupations through 2028. Most openings will arise from the need to replace workers who leave the field. Many aquarists advance to other positions, however, so openings do become available. Aquarists with advanced degrees and trai...

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