Biomedical Engineers


Overview

Introduction

Biomedical engineers are highly trained scientists who use engineering and life science principles to research biological aspects of animal and human life. They develop new theories, and they modify, test, and prove existing theories on life systems. They design health care instruments and devices or apply engineering principles to the study of human systems. There are approximately 19,800 biomedical engineers employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$88,550

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Internship


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Skills

Computer


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Personality Traits

Problem-Solving

Earnings

The amount a biomedical engineer earns is dependent upon education, experience, and type of employer. In October 2019, Indeed.com reported the average salary for biomedical engineers was $75,609. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, biomedical engineers had a median yearly income of $88,550 in May 2018. At the low end of the pay scale, 10 percent earned less than $51,890 per year, and at ...

Work Environment

Biomedical engineers who teach in a university will have much student contact in the classroom, the laboratory, and the office. They also will be expected to serve on relevant committees while continuing their teaching, research, and writing responsibilities. As competition for teaching positions increases, the requirement that professors publish papers will increase. Professors usually are res...

Outlook

There will be great demand for skilled biomedical engineers in the future. Prospects look particularly good in the health care industry, which will continue to grow rapidly, primarily because people are living longer and require better medical devices and equipment. The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that employment for biomedical engineers will grow about as fast as the average for all care...

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