Geotechnical Engineers


Overview

Geotechnical Engineers

Introduction

Geotechnical engineers research and study soil to evaluate its suitability for foundations. They investigate and assess construction sites, conduct lab tests, create designs for structures, supervise construction, and write and present reports. They work on such projects as designing tunnels, roadways, retaining walls, and earthen dams, as well as help to create strategies for the clean-up and management of contaminated sites.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$65,672

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Internship, co-op, or informal apprenticeship


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Skills

Computer


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

Geotechnical engineers had median annual earnings of $65,672 in December 2019, according to Salary.com. Salaries ranged from less than $54,203 to $73,898 or more. The U.S. Department of Labor reports that annual salaries for mining and geological engineers were $92,250 in May 2018. Salaries ranged from $54,550 to $151,030 or higher.

Engineers also receive employment benefits...

Work Environment

Geotechnical engineers work in offices and outdoors at construction sites. Approximately 25 percent of civil engineers (including geotechnical engineers) work more than 40 hours per week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Much of this extra time occurs when projects are nearing final deadlines. Geotechnical engineers also travel to different sites to oversee projects and consult with s...

Outlook

Employment for civil engineers is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all careers through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). Population growth coupled with the country's aging infrastructure will spark the need for more civil engineers. Projects they will be needed for include designing and constructing or expanding transportation, water supply, and pollution-c...

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