Surveyors


Overview

Introduction

Surveyors make exact measurements and locations of elevations, points, lines, and contours on or near Earth's surface. They measure distances between points to determine property boundaries and to provide data for mapmaking, construction projects, and other engineering purposes. There are approximately 45,220 surveyors employed in the United States. 

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$63,420

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Two to four years experience required


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Skills

Interpersonal


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Personality Traits

Hands On

Earnings

In May 2019, surveyors earned a median annual salary of $63,420, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The middle 50 percent earned between $47,750 and $84,120 a year. The lowest paid 10 percent were paid less than $36,110, and the highest paid 10 percent earned over $104,850 a year. In general, the natural gas distribution industry paid the highest wages to its surveyors, $93,810 a year.<...

Work Environment

Surveyors work 40-hour weeks except when overtime is necessary to meet a project deadline. The peak work period is during the summer months when weather conditions are most favorable. However, it is not uncommon for the surveyor to be exposed to adverse weather conditions.

Some survey projects may involve hazardous conditions, depending on the region and climate as well as the plant and ...

Outlook

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that employment for surveyors will grow by about 2 percent, slower than the average, through 2029. The coronavirus pandemic caused a slowdown for many businesses, however, surveying and mapping professionals have continued to work throughout and will continue to be needed. Job prospects will be best for surveyors who have college degrees and advanced field ...

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