Journalism Teachers


Overview

Journalism Teachers

Introduction

Journalism teachers teach students the rudiments of journalistic reporting and writing. They develop teaching outlines and lesson plans, give lectures, facilitate discussions and activities, keep class attendance records, assign homework, and evaluate student progress. They teach at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Journalism teachers are also known as journalism educators and journalism professors (if they teach at the college level).

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$60,320

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Previous teaching experience


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Skills

Organizational


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Personality Traits

Curious

Earnings

According to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), the median annual salary for high school teachers, including journalism teachers, was $60,320 in May 2018. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $39,740, and the top 10 percent earned $97,500 or more.

High school journalism teachers can often earn additional pay by working with students in extracurricular activities, such as acting as an ...

Work Environment

Most journalism teachers are contracted to work 10 months out of the year, with a two-month vacation during the summer. During their summer break, many continue their education to renew or upgrade their teaching licenses and earn higher salaries. Teachers in schools that operate year-round work eight-week sessions with one-week breaks in between and a five-week vacation in the winter.

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Outlook

Employment opportunities for high school teachers, including journalism teachers, are expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2028, according to the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH). The need to replace retiring teachers will provide many opportunities nationwide, but the demand will vary widely depending on geographic area. Inner-city scho...

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