Translators


Overview

Translators

Introduction

Translators focus on translating written materials, such as books, plays, technical or scientific papers, legal documents, laws, treaties, and decrees, from one language to another or multiple languages. There are approximately 77,400 translators and interpreters employed in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$51,830

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree


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Experience

Three to five years experience


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Skills

Foreign Language


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Personality Traits

Creative

Earnings

Earnings for translators vary depending on experience, skills, number of languages used, and employers. In government, translators generally begin at the GS-5 rating, earning from $30,113 to $39,149 in 2020. Those with a college degree can start at the higher GS-7 level, earning from $37,301 to $48,888. With an advanced degree, trainees begin at the GS-9 ($45,627 to $59,316), GS-10 ($50,246 to ...

Work Environment

Translators usually work in offices, although many spend considerable time in libraries and research centers. Freelance translators often work at home, using their own personal computers, the Internet, dictionaries, and other resource materials. Those employed by publishing companies typically work a standard 40-hour week.

Outlook

Employment opportunities for translators and interpreters are expected to grow by 20 percent through 2029, according to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), or much faster than the average for all careers. Increasing globalization and growth of a more diverse U.S. population will contribute to increased need for translators and interpreters. In addition, broadening global ties and international ...

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