Construction Inspectors


Overview

Introduction

Construction inspectors work for federal, state, and local governments. Their job is to examine the construction, alteration, or repair of highways, streets, sewer and water systems, dams, bridges, buildings, and other structures to ensure that they comply with building codes and ordinances, zoning regulations, and contract specifications. Approximately 117,300 construction and building inspectors work in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$59,700

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

Some Postsecondary Training


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Experience

Several years’ experience as a construction contractor, superviso


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Skills

Building/Trades


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Personality Traits

Curious

Earnings

The U.S. Department of Labor reports the median annual income for construction and building inspectors was $59,700 in May 2018. The lowest paid 10 percent of these workers had annual earnings of less than $35,440; the highest paid 10 percent made more than $97,310. Earnings vary based on the inspector's experience, the type of employer, and the location of the work. Salaries are higher in the N...

Work Environment

Construction inspectors work both indoors and outdoors, dividing their time between their offices and the work sites. Inspection sites are dirty and cluttered with tools, machinery, and debris. Although the work is not considered hazardous, inspectors must climb ladders and stairs and crawl under buildings.

The hours are usually regular, but when there is an accident at a site, the inspe...

Outlook

Employment of construction and building inspectors is projected to grow 7 percent from 2018 to 2028, faster than the average for all careers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Demand will be strongest in government and in firms specializing in architectural, engineering, and related services. In the wake of several high-profile construction accidents, the public has become more concern...

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