Bookkeeping and Accounting Clerks


Overview

Introduction

Bookkeeping and accounting clerks record financial transactions for government, business, and other organizations. They compute, classify, record, and verify numerical data in order to develop and maintain accurate financial records. There are nearly 1.6 million bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks employed in the United States.

Quick Facts


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Median Salary

$37,250

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Employment Prospects

Good

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Minimum Education Level

High School Diploma


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Experience

Internship


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Skills

Computer


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Personality Traits

Conventional

Earnings

Earnings for bookkeeping and accounting clerks are influenced by such factors as the size of the city or town where they work, their skill set and educational background, and the size and type of business for which they are employed. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, bookkeepers and accounting clerks earned a median income of $37,250 a year in May 2014. Clerks in the bottom 10 percenti...

Work Environment

The majority of office workers, including bookkeeping workers, usually work a 40-hour week, although some employees may work a 35- to 37-hour week. Bookkeeping and accounting clerks usually work in typical office settings. They are more likely to have a cubicle than an office. While the work pace is steady, it can also be routine and repetitive, especially in large companies where the employee ...

Outlook

Employment opportunities for bookkeepers and accounting clerks are expected to decline for all occupations through 2028, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Nevertheless, an increased emphasis on accuracy and accountability in the financial information of public companies and new regulations such as the International Financial Reporting Standards will create some openings. There also wil...

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