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Overview

Introduction

Constangy is a management-side labor and employment firm, with offices in 16 states across the U.S. Constangy handles a range of employment matters, including employment discrimination, harassment, and retaliation; wage and hour litigation; workplace safety; affirmative action compliance; OSHA; workers’ compensation; and ERISA and employee benefits. The firm also counsels clients on developing workplace policies. Among other positive aspects of working here, associates rave ab...

Firm Stats


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Total No. Attorneys (2021)


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No. of Partners Named (2020)


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Featured Rankings

Best Law Firms for Racial & Ethnic Diversity...


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Base Salary

Salary not disclosed....


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No. of U.S. Offices



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No. of International Offices

Vault Verdict

Candidates looking to work with Constangy should have some work experience under their belts—the firm hires mostly laterals, and places premiums on experience (particularly L&E experience), diversity, and law school attended. Expect questions about fit and why you’re looking to leave your current firm, but also choose good references—they will be called. The firm’s culture is friendly and professional. For those seeking a social atmosphere, the firm offers frequent firm-sponsored opportunities to get together with colleagues, but there isn’t much socializing outside of the office. Partners respect associates and treat them well, though associates note that the firm isn’t as transparent as it could be on matters like financials and salary. While compensation doesn’t reach B...

About the Firm

Constangy is a national labor and employment law firm that has been serving clients since 1946. Boasting a down-to-earth culture, the firm has close to 200 attorneys across 16 states.

Growing Up in ‘Hot-Lanta

Frank Constangy—known to his colleagues as ‘Mr. C’—established the firm in 1946 in Atlanta with partners Legree Davis and Mildred McClelland, who was one of the few female attorneys in Atlanta at the time. In 1950, Bill Prowell, formerly an attorney with the National Labor Relations Board ("NLRB"), joined the firm, and in 1961, the firm became Constangy & Prowell. After Contangy's death in the early 1970s, the firm fractured a bit but was reorganized by partners Lovic Brooks and Jim Smith as Constangy, Brooks & Smith and began to expand within the reg...

Associate Reviews


  • “[The] atmosphere in the office is professional, kind, and caring, but [we] rarely socialize outside of the office together.”
  • “[We] mostly socialize in [the] office—very little out-of-office socialization. Professionally, [the] culture is excellent. Partners genuinely respect my opinions and strategies and value my work.”
  • “Our office socializes on a fairly frequent basis. We have team lunches, team-organized events, and our managing partner will have us over for events as well.”
  • “Offices are relatively small and dispersed over the country, making it difficult to socialize with other associates. But partners are friendly and in-office interactions are fun. Everyone has a good personality.”
  • “Reviews and feedback are ongoing and personalized. Associates are treated well and are not simply workhorses. I handle many matters on my own even as a first-year associate.”
  • “Partners treat associates well across the board. The firm is not transparent as it relates to firm performances or finances. Everything is vague or broad. Reviews are conducted annually, and that process is pretty transparent except when it comes to salary determinations.”
  • “I generally only work with one partner and I have a great relationship with her. There are yearly performance reviews, but I haven't had one since I started right when reviews where being done. [There is] not much transparency in finances and internal promotion.”
  • “Partners embrace the open-door policy and are available to associates with any questions, whether they relate to work, the firm generally, or marketing. Associates have an annual performance review and receive informal feedback throughout the year.”
  • “The work ebbs and flows. Some months are very busy while others can be slow. I appreciate that the work I receive is pretty substantial. I'm pushed to pick up new skills and learn new areas of employment law on a daily basis.”
  • “I think the billable hour expectations are very reasonable. If an associate wants to bill a higher amount of hours for bonus purposes, the firm makes it possible. However, the expected amount of hours is reasonable and makes for a good work-life balance.”
  • “I think that the workload is appropriate for this type of firm. People are very respectful of your time, family and personal needs. [They’re] very understanding of work from home options/flexible schedules.”
  • “1,950 is the billable requirement for a bonus. 75 hours of the 1,950 can include marketing/training/pro bono time. 1,800 is the flat minimum you must get barring extenuating circumstances. Associates may receive quarterly bonuses if they may not make their 1950 target but are on track to do so during any given quarter.”
  • “Pay is a little under market, but for the work-life balance, it’s worth it. I wish bonuses were higher though.”
  • “Compensation and the bonus program are fair and reasonable with the expectations of the firm.”
  • “I feel as though salaries are slightly under market, but I appreciate the relaxed attitude towards hours and working from home/remotely.”
  • “Base salary is very good for the firm's size and legal market. The bonus system is average, but bonuses are based on hours realized, not total hours billed. As a result, this makes it extremely difficult to track hours over the course of the year and determine if you're on track to make your hours on the year.”
  • “I've been trusted with substantive legal work of all varieties since I started here. I've taken depositions, argued motions, and first-chaired bench trials as a fourth/fifth-year associate.”
  • “I joined as a second year and have mostly done substantive work from the get-go, including motions for summary judgment, depositions, and a solo mediation, [but] not a ton of discovery—which I’m grateful for. Lately, I’ve also had more direct client contact as well.”
  • “I get a large variety of work assignments that can range from preparing case assessments and budgets to preparing dispositive motions and handling EEOC mediations. I am very satisfied with the variety of work assignments that I am given.”
  • “As a first-year associate, I spent most of my time drafting motions, responding to discovery, assist in drafting briefs, conducting research, and drafting position statements for charges of discrimination.”
  • “We have an EAP, quarterly wellness newsletter, and the firm offers a monthly gym stipend. It’s also good about making sure people take vacation or leave without the pressure to work during the time off or falling behind afterwards.”
  • “The firm encourages participation in wellness webinars and similar.”
  • “The firm reimburses up to $60 each month for gym membership.”
  • “Fantastic free gym in our building. Also, remote work whenever needed helps with wellness.”
  • “We have very-little-to-no formal training for associates, but we are actively mentored by partners.”
  • “MCLE seminars are provided regularly by the firm. Mentoring is more informal, but the other associates are very receptive and eager to help each other.”
  • “I have partners who have been fantastic mentors, but I wish there were more formal training opportunities as well, for instance to go to a NITA depo or trial training.”
  • “We have marketing teams that help build skills for business development.”
  • “Partnership is very realistic for associates who have strong billable hours and at least moderate business development success. There are non-partner roles to which senior associates can transition, at least on a part-time basis. The typical exit opportunity for associates is to other labor and employment firms or to an in-house counsel position (often with a firm client).”
  • “I believe partnership is completely realistic for attorneys that would like to make partner provided they meet the necessary qualifications. I think the firm is pretty transparent about what those requirements are as well.”
  • “Partnership seems realistic. The firm actively cultivates business development skills for associates, including through a mandatory associate marketing mentorship program. The firm also has senior counsel who may work on a reduced/flexible hours basis. I am aware of attorneys exiting for positions at other firms and as in-house counsel.”
  • “Partnership is a realistic prospect. The firm does not hire large summer classes. Rather, the firm hires associates with the expectation they will become a partner and treats them accordingly.”
  • “The firm counts a limited number of pro bono hours toward associate billable hour goals and bonuses. The firm also contributes financially to local legal aid associations.”
  • “We get [a] 75-hour credit towards the billable target for non-billable activities, which can include pro bono work. I represented a student in a Title IX case last year, which was a great experience since I got to examine witnesses. It seems like most people find their own pro bono work though, so I wish it was more cohesive or promoted since I would love to do more.”
  • “We can get a certain amount of credit towards billable hours for pro bono work, but I do not see many attorneys in this office engaging in or promoting pro bono work.”
  • “I firmly believe that our firm is an excellent example of a firm that is truly committed to diversity. The number of successful female and diverse partners in the firm is inspiring and sets an amazing example for women and diverse associates.”
  • “The firm is a leader amongst law firms with respect to hiring AND retaining female and diverse attorneys, second to none. The firm as a whole demonstrates a commitment to a diverse workforce as evidenced by the compilation of its Executive Committee, and office heads.”
  • “The firm hires individuals in all diverse groups. I have never experienced or encountered a situation in which the firm failed to promote diversity.”
  • “The workplace is extremely diverse in every respect and management is very welcoming and inclusive to everyone.”

Diversity at Constangy Brooks, Smith & Prophete LLP

"As a firm, Constangy has been at the forefront in advancing roles for women and minorities in the legal profession. In our earliest years, when women represented fewer than 3% of practicing attorneys, Mildred McClelland was one of the firm's first partners, arguing cases in courts and before federal agencies. Before joining the firm in the 1960s, partner Jim Smith served on the American Bar Association's inaugural committee advising the early efforts of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — helping the lead the way in..."

Getting Hired Here


  • “We generally don’t hire straight out of law school, so although the school and grades are important, experience is more important. There is also a large focus on diversity and fit. Many recent hires have come in through word of mouth.”
  • “Diversity and work experience appear to be notable factors.”
  • “They look for someone with employment experience or litigation experience. I think law school is important, personality, diversity, and prior work experience. We don't have feeder schools and don't seem to hire many first-year associates. All the hires I have seen are lateral hires.”
  • “[The] firm values real world experience and prior experience in labor and employment law.”
  • “Why would [you] make a good fit, how do you handle confrontation, how do you handle a situation if you don't understand something, etc.”
  • “My interviews were extremely conversational, for the most part. I came from a non-employment background, and so I was asked why I wanted to switch practice areas. Because virtually everyone is a lateral, expect to be asked why you are looking to leave your firm.”
  • “I don’t recall what I was asked, but I always ask what candidates are looking for in a firm, and as an associate, what would they like to know about the firm. Both questions are to determine fit since I figure the partners can suss out experience.”
  • “All significant people you have worked with in the past are called as part of a rigorous screening process to only hire the most qualified candidates.”